45 Comments

  1. Oxy Bright Dark
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    Being delayed at gatwick due to drones makes this more real

    Reply

  2. lightsboy1
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    And in December 2018 the UK suddenly started to take drone misuse seriously.

    Reply

  3. flanker
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    As you've said, so far there has been no dangerous accidents involving UAVs and manned aircraft. As you said, part of the reason is most UAV pilots have enough brain cells to know not to fly them close to dangerous areas. That being said, there's very little evidence that says a hobby grade UAV can cause life-threatening damage to a manned aircraft.

    FPV planes are usually 1 to 2 kilos of foam. Depending on where it's engine is, it probably won't cause any harm if you took it to your face. Let alone a full-size aircraft.

    Commercial FPV drones like that DJI you got there, weights around 1 to 2 KGs. If you take them to the face, you'll definitely feel it. But there's no evidence that suggests a single prop aircraft can't just chew it and spit it out. Sure it could damage the propeller, but considering birds that are considerably heavier than 2 KGs regularly impact them and nothing ever happens, there's really no reason to think a drone impact would instantly destroy a Cessna.

    I really love your work, Tom. But your "warning" in this video is based on an unscientific assumption. One might even call it fear mongering. It frankly reminded me quite a bit of those "Devil worshipers at CERN will open a portal to hell and doom us all" of folks…

    Reply

  4. Detis Broham
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    In the US, drones must be registered with the FAA and must follow rules and regs set forth. Also, commercially you need a pilots license as well. The state's really don't have much to do with it.

    Reply

  5. Jhawk2tall
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    As a former air traffic controller, the problem is only a problem around airports or General aviation aircraft. General aviation aircraft cannot fly below 500 feet, that’s a long ways up if you actually think about it. Only the high powered drones are able to get up there. The other areas are airports when the aircraft or below 500 feet. Here in America we have second amendment which allows us to keep our weapons. We have found another great use for them. If a drone is spotted where it should not be and is causing a problem, just shoot it down. The operator will get the point when they lose a few hundred bucks. No need to find them.
    I was also told that there is a tool developing that they can aim at the drone that will block radio signal and just make the thing crash…..but that isn’t as fun

    Reply

  6. Anderson Klein
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    It is sad that what you say is so true, all it takes is one tragic magazine headline before all hell breaks loose and they start putting out those ridiculous laws.

    Reply

  7. stuntaneous
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    The report link provided is now dead, interestingly.

    Reply

  8. Limp Wibbler
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    I fly my drone illegally. Sadly it is nothing bad, but drones are basically banned by me. So my illegal activity is flying around a church. It sucks that some people find it ok to fly at airports or towards people.

    Reply

  9. CambridgeMart
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    Number of aircraft that have collided with 'drones' – 0, number of aircraft damaged by collisions with kites – 2, as of September 2017

    Reply

  10. Dan C.
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    As a private pilot myself, I certainly appreciate the efforts done by authorities in various countries to try and minimize the risks of collisions with drones.  But I do have to wonder – a lot of drones weigh less than some birds.  Not that I want to collide with a bird or a drone for that matter, but there will always be more birds in the sky than drones.  Does legislation to reduce the likelihood of drone collision with aircraft statistically significantly reduce the chances of mid-air collision with "something"?  When a drone collision happens (and it will eventually) I'd be very curious to see how damage compares to a bird strike… if not significantly worse or more dangerous, are we largely wasting our time?  Now on the other hand, if someone was spending time and money to come up with ways to detect and avoid all small objects (birds and drones included), that would potentially be an interesting and useful technology.

    Reply

  11. Finton Stack
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    british goverment has released pkans today to have all drones, quadcopters etc registered if they weigh more than 250g. good luck enforcing that one

    Reply

  12. jayteegamble
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    I'm from the future and we made it a year without a drone-airliner collision.

    Reply

  13. Allan Tham
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    Sounds like a terrorist attack waiting to happen.

    Reply

  14. Robert Jensen
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    I seriously, seriously think we're not going to see a quadcopter cause a civilian aircraft to crash, like, ever. Just not going to happen. We're talking about aircraft that have been smacking into 20-30 LB birds for decades, and blasting right through them, without crashing. Only time I ever saw a plane even crash due to birds, was when that 2-engine Airbus 320 lost both engines, but hell that thing sucked in probably 20-30 birds–big ones–all at once.

    Reply

  15. kiefac.
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    It's been a year+. has there been a crash yet?

    Reply

  16. shade_grey
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    Can't manufacturers just put radar transmitters on drones that are powerful enough to warn incoming aircraft of a possible collision?

    Reply

  17. Slowburn
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    I thought the FAA governed the laws on UAVs in the USA?? I don't feel like looking it up, so I guess I will assume Tom is right about States having jurisdiction…

    Reply

  18. Joel Shewmaker
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    I was watching a music video by the PianoGuys, and one scene really stuck out at me. Steve was playing the cello kind of close to the edge of a cliff. Then the camera swooped overhead, which is typically a crane shot. Then, the camera went over the cliff and up, which would be indicative of a helicopter shot. It took me only a few viewings to realise it was a drone that made that shot possible in one motion.

    Reply

  19. Joe Kozak
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    chase everyone "up" ? interesting, i say chase down..

    Reply

  20. The Generalissimo
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    I think high flying drones should be equipped with iff signals.

    Reply

  21. 41Extremo
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    I dont agree that there will be a collision within the next 2 years, it would be so hard to actually hit something even if you were actually trying

    Reply

  22. 1blackice1
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    Drones, Desert, and danger? Could have sworn from the title and thumbnail you were in Pakistan.

    Reply

  23. Ernest Bywater
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    A commercial jet having an engine eating a drone while in final approach is very likely to result ins a crashed aircraft due to how finely balanced the aircraft is at that point..

    Reply

  24. Smackhead wayney
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    hi

    Reply

  25. Ryan D'souza
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    Ass a drone enthusiast, it pisses me off to no end that people (who have no idea how to fly drones) go head and fly straight out of view because they can, with no regard for safety.

    I've been flying for nearly 3 years now and I don't fly over public areas, and don't ever go out of line of sight.

    Then you have the spoilt brats who get a DJI for christmas and decide its a hell of a good idea to go look at an airport with tier new drone.

    Sorry. Rant over.

    Reply

  26. andrewandrew599
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    0:42 Small correction. That's only one in 10,000 pilots who CLAIM to see a drone. Eyewitness reports are the lowest held type of evidence next to hearsay.

    Reply

  27. Robin Rai
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    I hate the rich assholes with "a new toy" who cause these incidents ruining the hobby for enthusiasts who actually follow logical rules.

    Reply

  28. Eric Taylor
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    0:30 This number is misleading. The 30000 passenger flights make up only a tiny fraction of the number of manned aircraft aloft at any given time. The vast majority are general aviation. This is mostly made up of small single engine "Cessna" type airplanes.

    Reply

  29. Greg Fox
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    Now I just want to see what it looks like for a drone to get sucked into a turbine.

    It's kinda sad knowing we have to wait for people to die for meaningful legislature to be passed.

    Reply

  30. NoriMori
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    Tom: "In the US, there were more than a hundred close encounters between drones and manned aircraft –"
    Me: "That's it? That seems pretty tame considering –"
    Tom: "– every month this year."
    Me: "…Oh."

    Congrats Tom, you just pulled a Vsauce/Numberphile moment: "The number of [X] in [Y] is 6400" "Oh, that's not so bad –" "– million million." "WHA?!"

    Reply

  31. Daniel K
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    I just realized there are captions in Hungarian! De jó!

    Reply

  32. Iykury
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    2:07 He built it, and no one came.

    Reply

  33. Elmo
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    Why not Tag them with a electronic license number that can be picked up on a hand held device, also put something electronic in them that a radar or other device could pick them up?

    Reply

  34. 49metal
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    Drones in the 1000-1500 gram range are mostly composed of plastic and a dense lithium battery often around 300-400g. This battery is capable of damaging aircraft, just as a large bird or group of birds can. On the other hand, the hazard posed by drones is insignificant to that of the ambient danger of bird strikes. Despite this, other than some modest mitigation efforts, the menace of bird strikes is basically tolerated by aviation. Poisoning all flocks of non-endangered birds near large airports could do a great deal to reduce the risk, yet we don't do it because it is seen as "mean." Nevertheless, the same people who would become positively hysterical at the mass poisoning of dangerous birds flocks, are also getting the runs from the fact that drones not only exist but are being controlled by someone other than themselves or the government! The novelty of drones has caused people to come unhinged, even though they are barely materially different from the metal-engined RC planes that have darkly menaced our communal skies for decades. Obviously, hobbyists should not fly RC aircraft over busy airports, but beyond that, people should get a grip. They should considered worrying about some of life's genuine hazards like birds and sunlight and slippery pavement and lightning.

    Reply

  35. robert linke
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    a few weeks ago, at runway 18C the central run way running south-north, or north-south if you take the 36C variant, depending on the wind, a drone swooped by an an airbus and 2 other planes wich are not type mentioned. all planes landed safely, but ATC closed down the runway , and airport police searched for them a few hours, not to be found…

    official ivestigations bij trafic security board, and ATC the Netherlands is being executed.
    a letter also have been sent to the paliament by ATC, pilot organisation, schiphol managment, and the traffic safty board, demanding sharper rules and enforceement of these rules on drones.

    cause this time it went alright, next time it just might not go that well…..

    Reply

  36. Pyroslav x
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    Is there a law, if you "find" a drone of any kind, is it considered a found object, so u can keep it for your electro-aviatic projects? Is it considered a theft? Like, how long u have to wait for noone to show up before u can officialy disconect the battery (transmiting gps data) and run home with new toy 🙂

    Reply

  37. Ian Pogue
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    A tiny drone probably wont take out an airliner engine. You should see the tests they put those things through. Like shooting tons of chicken carcasses at them from a cannon. Or pretty much filling the intake with huge hail or water.

    Reply

  38. Baxter Ross
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    So basically, the UK has a bunch of dumb laws. Free the drones!

    Reply

  39. Harry Scutt
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    Well a drone literally just crashed into an Airbus today at Heathrow

    Reply

  40. Aidan Williams
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    Looks like the prediction of a Plane hitting a Drone has come true at Heathrow

    Reply

  41. Franz Luggin
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    1:46 Sooo, if it's a small aircraft, the flight will go parabola-shaped?

    Reply

  42. Vincent Lee
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    In the UK I had an idiot try and grab my controller off (he said he wanted a go) me when I was in the middle of landing. It's nerv racking enough to fly one, never mind the odd kid that wants a peak of what the drone sees, but a adult! Please people have some sense.

    Oh and I'm building a full self piloting UAV. Question is how many computers will need to avoid idiots that come way too close during landing.

    Reply

  43. Thomas Wilson
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    Was that hat and Ed bassmaster

    Reply

  44. Valery Konovalov
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    SUPER!

    Reply

  45. LegendLength
    March 19, 2019 @ 7:07 pm

    In Australia you need a FULL helicopter license to operate a drone commercially. That includes any use of drone footage in a youtube video, as you are potentially making money from views. Cost is $10,000 USD+ .

    So while I agree we need to have better laws I think it's easy for governments to go too far and make very silly laws.

    Reply

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